Survey of Environment, Safety, and Health Concerns of Traditional Indian Artisans and Craftspeople

Survey of Environment, Safety, and Health Concerns of Traditional Indian Artisans and Craftspeople (Summer 1993)

The Environmental Office of Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council and the Northern Pueblos Institute of Northern New Mexico Community College are interested in knowing if artists and craftsmen are concerned about whether there are health, safety, or environmental risks to themselves or others in their occupation. Please take a few minutes to fill in this questionnaire. Depending on the interest of the community, we will use the questionnaire results to develop craft and hazard-specific information booklets and workshops for artisans; work with home-based artists and small businesses to modify processes cheaply and efficiently; and engineer new technology or tools or safety equipment appropriate to the tasks involved.


1) What crafts or arts do you practice?

2) Have you ever been concerned about whether there are negative health or safety or environmental risks from your chosen work to you, your family, co-workers, unborn children, others? 0 No 0 Yes.

If so, what kinds of concerns?

3) During which activities have you noticed trouble breathing, skin rashes, headaches, or other health problems? 0 Never

Do you use a disposable face mask? 0Yes 0 Never

Which activities have bothered others around you? What kind of symptoms? 0 Never

4) Have you ever noticed joint stiffness or pain? 0 No 0 Yes. During which activities?

5) Do you stand or sit for long periods of time? 0 No 0 Yes. How long at a time?

Please turn over

6) Please identify if any of the following are part of your craftmaking.

0 dung or manure kilns (pottery firing)

0 compressed gasses: 0 propane 0 oxygen 0 acetylene

0 silver

0 other metals

0 solder and soldering

0 bone, antler, horn, teeth (especially cutting, grinding, buffing)

0 lacquer, shellac, varnish

0 acrylic or plastic-based paints

0 oil-based paints

0 solvents for paint or wood coatings

0 commercial clays, slips, or muds

0 collected slips, clays, soils, muds, or minerals (Mother Earth materials)

0 commercial dyes and mordants

0 collected or natural dyes and mordants

0 vinegar, tannin, nitric acid, other acids or bleach (commercial or natural)

0 lye, lime, ammonia, or other bases

0 leather or animal skins (especially the use or preparation of split leathers)

0 7) Are you interested in the best way to prevent decay, fungus, mildew, or insects in organic materials, such as feathers and feathered headpieces?

0 8) Would you be interested in participating in training workshops on health and safety hazards and protection?

0 9) Would you be interested in participating further in our project? For example, could we observe you at your craft/art or discuss your skill with you further in order to assess possible hazards and develop solutions? Please print below your name, address, phone number where you can be reached:

Please return this questionnaire to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council booth or mail it to: [contact info no longer valid]
M. Pamela Bumsted, Ph.D. Environmental Office, PO Box 969, San Juan Pueblo, NM 87566 or to Karen Young,ENIPC Northern Pueblos Institute, NNMCC, 1002 N. Oñate Street, Española, NM 87532


[Cover page]

Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) of Traditional Indian Artisans and Craftspeople Project

This is a project to identify any environmental, safety, or health hazards resulting from their occupation that may be of concern to American Indian artisans and craftspeople. While hazards of “western” art, industrial crafts, or fine arts have been examined (e.g., lead glazes, oil paints) almost no basic or applied research has been directed towards traditional arts, especially those practiced in Southwestern communities. Community members will work with us to identify hazards and to develop new, or to apply any existing, culturally appropriate processes, materials, protective clothing, equipment, information, or training to mitigate these hazards.

This project is a joint effort of the Environmental Office of Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council, Inc., Northern Pueblos Institute of Northern New Mexico Community College, the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Technology Transfer Training (ECMT3 I) project of the US Dept. of Energy and Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (Organizations 6611, 7711, 7712), and the Hazardous Materials Management Program of Santa Fé Community College.

To be on our mailing list for further information, please return the bottom portion to the ENIPC booth or mail to:

M. Pamela Bumsted, Ph.D. or Karen Young

Environmental Office, ENIPC Northern Pueblos Institute, NNMCC

PO Box 969 1002 N. Oñate Street

San Juan Pueblo, NM 87566 Española, NM 87532

505-852-4265 505-747-2194

Please keep me informed of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) of Traditional Indian Artisans and Craftspeople Project:

Name:
Address:
Phone (optional):

Project Sponsors:
Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council, Inc.
Environmental Office
M. Pamela Bumsted, Ph.D., Assoc. Director
PO Box 969
San Juan Pueblo, NM 87566-0969

Northern New Mexico Community College
Northern Pueblos Institute
Karen Young, Coordinator
1002 N. Oñate Street
Española, NM 87532

Santa Fé Community College
Hazardous Materials Management Program
Mary Ann Walz, Coordinator
PO Box 4187
Santa Fé, NM 87502

Sandia National Laboratories
Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Technology Transfer Training Project
PO Box 5800
Albuquerque, NM 87185-5800
Robyn Steifeld, Organization 6611
Scott W. Stafford, Organization 7711
Patrick Herring, Organization 7711
Vicki Cibicki, Organization 7711

Santa Clara Health Center
Eusebio Toya, Health Educator
RR1, Box 446
Española, NM 87532

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