How to Buy Genuine American Indian Arts and Crafts

Because I have been concerned with the

[and here, http://13C4.wordpress.com/2006/01/11/pueblo-envtl-concerns-solutions/] of Native crafts and art, and in

selling such crafts to the public for artisans, I have also had to learn the legal aspects of adding such a value to those crafts. Here are the latest regulations.

How to Buy Genuine American Indian Arts and Crafts By U.S. Federal Trade Commission ( FTC) Mar 5, 2006, 11:24 Facts for Consumers posted here, http://communitydispatch.com/artman/publish/article_4050.shtml PDF Version is here http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/products/indianart.pdf

How to Buy Genuine American Indian Arts and Crafts
For an Indian art or craft object to be an “Indian product” all work on the product must have been by an Indian or Indians. More information about the Indian Arts and Crafts Act and related regulations can be obtained by visiting the Web site of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, www.iacb.doi.gov, or by calling the Board’s toll-free number, 1–888–ART–FAKE.

…. Whether you’re drawn to the beauty of turquoise and silver jewelry or the earth tone colors of Indian pottery, having some knowledge about American Indian arts and crafts can help you get the most for your money. Be aware also that because Indian arts and crafts are prized and often command higher prices, a few unscrupulous sellers misrepresent imitation arts and crafts as genuine. Getting What You Pay For The Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 helps ensure that buyers of Indian arts and crafts products get what they pay for by making it illegal to misrepresent that a product is made by an Indian….

In advertising or marketing a product, it is a violation of the Act to state or imply falsely that the product is made by an Indian or is the product of a particular tribe. For example, advertising or marketing a product as “Navajo Jewelry” that is not produced by members of the Navajo Nation is a violation of the law. Terms such as “Indian,” “Native American” or the name of a particular Indian tribe, accompanied by qualifiers such as “ancestry,” “descent” and “heritage” — for instance, “Native American heritage” or “Cherokee descent” — do not mean that the person is a member of an Indian tribe. These terms do mean that the person is of descent, heritage or ancestry of the tribe, and the terms should be used only if truthful.

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