Monthly Archives: June 2007

Sources of indigenous peoples info from Librarians’ Internet Index

LII is such a great resource, available through RSS feed.

Librarians’ Internet Index: New This Week New and newly-discovered Web sites for librarians and everyone else, updated every Thursday morning. See more resources on our site

  • CBC News In Depth: Aboriginal Canadians
  • News and feature stories about Canada’s aboriginal population of Indians, Métis, and Inuit, which “is about 1.5 million people, spanning the nation and bordering three oceans.” Topics include aboriginal history, land claims, leaders, residential schools, aboriginal people and the Canadian military, and more. Includes a FAQ on aboriginal Canadians, photos, and statistics. From the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/aboriginals/
  • Australian Indigenous People Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Inhabitants of Australia Extensive collection of links to websites related to indigenous populations in Australia. Topics include biographies, art and artists, writers, community leaders, music, politicians, athletes, culture, history, language, reconciliation, land rights, sacred sites, and more. From the P.L. Duffy Resource Centre, Trinity College, Western Australia. http://www.trinity.wa.edu.au/plduffyrc/indig/
  • Indigenous Australia
    “This site explores Indigenous Australia through storytelling, cultures and histories. … You can also use this site to find out about the Indigenous Australia exhibition at the Australian Museum.” Features timelines, audio and video clips of stories from the cultures of indigenous Australians, a virtual tour of the museum exhibit (may not work in all browsers), and essays about cultural heritage, spirituality, family, land, and social justice. From the Australian Museum. http://www.dreamtime.net.au/
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Antiques as HazArt (Mercury)

Mercury used to be part of the preservation technique in museums, as a bug killer. This makes analyzing museum specimens for environmental change difficult (pre- and post-industrial; regional ecological change in water, temperature, etc over time using stable nuclides; etc.) There was an interesting study on Berlin museum specimens (feathers) for mercury pollution in the urban environments some 20 years ago. [References in deep storage, I’m afraid. And NIH, DOE, and NSF have never been interested in funding chemical ecology modelling of long-term human environmental change made possible via stable nuclides.] I have another reference I will find about the hazards of handling museum specimens which have been curated in the outmoded manner for pest control and not for environmental heritage.

CDC: Antiques Can Pose Mercury Hazard from the Miami Herald (Registration Required)

ALBANY, N.Y. — Careful with that antique clock. It could pose a mercury hazard. The silvery, skittering, and toxic liquid can be found in some antiques. Mirrors can be backed with mercury and tin; Clock pendulums might be weighted with embedded vials of mercury; and barometers, thermometers and lamps may have mercury in their bases for ballast.

The problem is that mercury in old items can leak, particularly as seals age or when the items are moved, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Ask Ann Smith, whose heirloom clock’s pendulum leaked mercury onto the carpet of her gift store in rural Delhi, N.Y., as a cleaner moved it. An attempt to vacuum the tiny silver balls off the carpet only made things worse, requiring a hazardous materials team to be dispatched to Parker House Gifts and Accessories last summer.

To read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation/AP/story/144213.html Or: http://tinyurl.com/3aym8u

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Alaska’s state song, both verses wanted

Dave, a reader of Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub, was looking for a recording of both verses of the Alaska state song. Ed Darrell, bathtub incarnate, was able to track down a version of Fred Waring’s chorale singing the first verse. To get a copy, contact him at
http://timpanogos.wordpress.com/2007/01/12/song-for-the-alaska-flag/

Does anyone know of an on-line version of the song, both verses? Check out what we’ve found out so far. Also, visit Ed’s great collection on flag etiquette, history, patriotism, etc.

REVISED 2008-05-20 from Daniel Cornwall, Head of Information Services, Alaska State Library,

The Alaska State Library serves all:
State Employees – http://library.state.ak.us/is/infoserv.html
Librarians – http://library.state.ak.us/dev/libdev.html
Everyone else! – http://library.state.ak.us/
Ask us! – http://library.state.ak.us/forms/askalibindex.html

Thank you for contacting the Alaska State Library regarding an online version of BOTH verses of Alaska’s State Song. The Alaska Youth Choir sang both verses for the opening session of the Alaska House of Representatives on January 14, 2002. Their song can be found on this archived audio file from Gavel to Gavel:
http://archive.ktoo.org:8081/gavel/B63EB5B6/2002/01/HFLS020114A.mp3

The song with two verses can be found on this file from 7 min 41 sec TO 10 min 16 sec.

PS– the video of former Lt Governor Fran Ulmer is posted directly at http://www.museums.state.ak.us/EightStars/src/multimedia/fran_ulmer.mov According to Ms Ulmer, she has recorded both verses for the Permanent Fund Corp. Anyone know where these might be posted?

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Art is older than thought

Radiocarbon dates reveal that New Guinea art is older than thought

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Footprints much, much older than thought

Alleged 40,000-year-old human footprints in Mexico much, much older than thought

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